2020-08-15

The download speeds of Starlink SpaceX are revealed which is from 11Mbps to 60Mbps

Article Edited by | Jhon N |

Image:-Satelites

Tests by Ookla don't show SpaceX gigabit speeds, but this is early.

Beta users of the Starlink satellite broadband service SpaceX get download speeds of between 11Mbps and 60Mbps, according to tests performed with the speed testing tool of Ookla.net. Test speeds showed upload speeds between 5Mbps and 18Mbps.

The very same tests have shown latensies or ping rates of between 31 and 94ms during the last two weeks. This is not an extensive study of the speeds and latency of Starlink and it is therefore not clear that this is what Internet users should expect when Starlink satellites become completely deployed and the service becomes marketable. We asked SpaceX a few questions yesterday about the rapid test results and updated this article if the answers are received.

Beta testers must sign agreements with non-disclosure so that these speed tests could be one of the only real-world insight during these tests. SpaceX told the Fed that Stardlink would ultimately hit gigabit speeds, stating in the Federal Communications Commission 2016 application that "the system will be able to offer high bandwidth (to 1Gb / s per user), low-latency broadband services for users and companies in the US and worldwide once it is fully optimised with final implementation." SpaceX launched about 600 satellite services.

Although 60Mbps isn't a gigabit, it's much higher than the speeds of several DSL services in rural areas where SpaceX will likely see much interest, than some of the lower cable speed levels. Some Internet users said on the Reddit Thread that they would like to get the speeds shown in the Starlink tests because they are currently stuck at or below 1 Mbps. An average download speed in the US of 96,25Mbps and the average upload of 32,88Mbps were found in the Ookla report on fixed broadband speeds in December 2018. SpaceX plans to accommodate up to 5 million internet users in the US.

In March, Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX said, "We target latency below 20 milliseconds, so someone can play a competitive rapid responsive Video Game." SpaceX satellites have low Earth orbit between 540 kilometres and 570 kilometres and can be latency much lower than geostationary orbiting satellites at 35.000 kilometres.

FCC president Ajit Pai doubted Musk 's claims for latency, and in May 2020 he proposed the classification as high latency providers of SpaceX and other satellite operators, i.e. For the purposes of a funding distribution for rural-broadband, above 100ms. The FCC endorsed that plan, but said companies such as SpaceX will have to demonstrate that they have low latencies, and they still have "serious doubts" that SpaceX and similar providers will be able to deliver less than 100ms of latencies.

In Ookla speed tests, ping and latency are the same thing, says one of the supporting documents for the service. It takes milliseconds to measure the round trip time when a client 's device transmits a message to the server and sends a reply. "This test is repeated several times, the lowest value being the ultimate outcome," says Ookla.

As the FCC wrote, the latency of a satellite network is 'the time required to delay the propagation of the data,' the time it takes for a radio wave to move from the satellite to the Earth and back, and the 'processing delay' the processing time it takes for the network to process the data.

While the Ookla Starlink speed-test latency is not below 20 m, it is lower than the FCC threshold of 100 m. Ookla says players for competitive online gaming should be in "winning" for latency or ping up to 59ms and "in the game" up to 129ms and up. The 35 best online gaming cities in the world have ping rates between 8 and 28 m, according to an Ookla report last year.

The distance between the user and the server affects latency testing. The Reddit Ookla tests show that the server tests in Los Angeles and Seattle; the northern US and Southern Canada beta tests are scheduled for SpaceX, but the Stop Cap story says that so far, testers have only gone to rural areas in Washington.